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& daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters of Queen Victoria

 

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Viceroy's Durbar Ball, in Diwan-I-Am, Delhi Fort

Lady Mountbatten dressed for the coronation of George VI, taken by Yevonde, 1937

Evoking the elegance of one part of this astonishing woman's lifestyle, Lady Mountbatten's tiara remains a dazzling tribute to a unique kind of aristocratic glamour.

Thought to have been made around 1910 by a leading French jeweller, possibly Chaumet or Cartier, it is pierced and millegrain-set with circular-cut diamonds in a design of meandering scroll and trefoil motifs. Set in platinum, the tiara has a distinctly modern feel - its fluid symmetry setting it apart from the more formal designs associated with heavier and earlier pieces set in silver and gold

Picture of some occasion:

Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, with his wife Edwina as Viceroy and Vicereine of India, dressed in official regalia

Lord Louis and Countess Edwina Mountbatten of Burma dressed for the Coronation of Queen Elisabeth II, wearing Tiara and the family jewels, the peer coronets in the hands

The"Tutti-frutti" bandeau of Lady Mountbatten

Emerald Diamond Necklace of Countess Mountbatten of Burma

Art -Deco Necklace of Lady Edwina Mountbatten Vicereine of India

Other Jewels of the Family:

The Star Tiara

Battenberg-Tiara

Milford-Haven-Amethyst Tiara

Other english Treasures:

The Hardcourt Emeralds

Devonshire Tiara and Jewels

Londonderry Jewels -Turquoise Necklace

M O U N T B A T T E N - B A T T E N B E R G
LADY MOUNTBATTEN’S TIARA

MAGNIFICENT and important tiara, previously owned and worn by one of the most beautiful and distinguished women of her day.

The pierced band of undulating scrollwork and trefoil motifs surmounted by thirteen trefoils graduating in size from the centre, millegrain set throughout with cushion-shaped, circular-, single-cut and rose diamonds

An object of dazzling beauty, Lady Louis Mountbatten's tiara evokes at a glance the glamour of the circles in which she moved. The tiara, which was offered for sale by Lady Mountbatten's daughter Lady Pamela Hicks and sold for 149,650 GBP


Perhaps the most characteristic jewels of the 20th century, tiaras were the preserve of a moneyed elite and de rigeur for both formal and festive occasions. The exuberant, stylish and glamorous social life of the time required that elegant women wore this most flattering ornament not only at court but also at the theatre or the opera in Paris, London and New York. Jewellers were literally flooded with commissions for this desirable and obligatory accessory and arguably, more tiaras were constructed at this time than at any other.

Lady Mountbatten's tiara is a magnificent example of the elegance and lavishness of these early 20th century head ornaments.
The overall design, inspired by the shape of the traditional kokoshnik, is softened by the sinuous meandering of the foliate motifs.
The impeccable workmanship of the setting, realised with the minimum amount of platinum and finished with a fine millegrain decoration, offsets the soft shapes of the old cut diamonds. Both design and workmanship are consistent with the work of the major Parisian Maisons.
Research in Chaumet's archives has revealed a similarity in design to one of the firm's maquettes but the meandering pattern and kokoshnik design have been extensively used by Cartier too. Interestingly, this tiara displays unclear maker's marks that could be interpreted as Chaumet, yet is fitted in a Cartier case.

Wealthy in her own right from her grandfather, Sir Ernest Cassell, she married Lord Louis Mountbatten, younger son of Admiral of the Fleet, the Marquess of Milford Haven (formerly Prince Louis of Battenberg) and his wife Victoria, a granddaughter of Queen Victoria and was at his side as the last Vicereine of India and the first Countess Mountbatten of Burma.

An acclaimed beauty and society hostess, she did not rest upon her privilege alone but devoted herself to humanitarian causes throughout her life. She helped organise the welfare services for returning allied prisoners of war in South East Asia, she helped co-ordinate the various aid organisations set up to combat the violence and population displacement following the independence of India, she was Chairman of the St John and Red Cross Services Hospitals Welfare Department, Superintendent-in-Chief of the St John Ambulance Brigade Overseas, President of the Save the Children Fund and Vice President of the Royal College of Nursing. She died in 1960 whilst on a tour of inspection for the St John's Ambulance Brigade in Northern Borneo and was buried at sea off Portsmouth with naval honours

Source:Sothebys

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